The Reality of German Shepherd Adoption

About Animal Shelters

Shelters and humane societies were created to care for stray and abused animals. They weren’t meant to be a drop-off for people who don’t want their pets anymore. Shelters, on average, take in 100 new animals or more each day. Let’s face it – there won’t be enough good homes for all of them. Even the best shelters can’t boast much more than a 50% adoption rates. Only the youngest, friendliest, cutest and best-behaved dogs are going to be adopted.

By law, stray pets must be kept several days for their owners to reclaim them. They may not be destroyed until that period is up. These laws don’t protect dogs that have been given up by their owners. They may be destroyed at any time. Shelters don’t want to kill all these animals but they don’t have a choice. There just isn’t enough room for all of them. Shelters today are so overcrowded that your dog could be killed the same day it arrives.

Being purebred won’t help your dog’s chances of adoption either – almost half of the dogs in many shelters are purebreds. Chances are things will be worse for your dog because he is a German Shepherd. Due to the breed’s bad reputation and the attraction these dogs have on undesirable individuals, *many* shelters across the nation have a “non-adoption” policy on German Shepherd type dogs and will not put them up for adoption at all. Your dog may be as good as dead when he walks in the door. If your German Shepherd is old, has health problems or poor attitudes toward strangers; its chances of adoption are slim to none.

Sending your dog to a shelter in hopes that he’ll find a good home is wishful thinking. It’s more likely that you’ll be signing your German Shepherds death warrant. A shelter is your last resort only after all your best efforts have failed.

About “no-kill” shelters and breed rescue services

True “no-kill” shelters are few and far between. Obviously, no one wants to see their pet killed so the demand for no-kill shelter services is high. So high that they’re forced to turn away many pets because they don’t have room for them all. Often, they have to choose only the most adoptable dogs to work with. German Shepherds are certainly not the easiest dogs to place….

Breed rescue services are small, private, shelter-like groups run by volunteers dedicated to a particular breed. Most of them operate out of the volunteers’ homes. Like no-kill shelters, demand for their services is high, so high that your dog may be turned away for lack of room. Some breed rescues can still help you place your dog through a referral service. You’ll have the most success if you follow the rescue service’s advice and are willing to do your share of the work to find a new home

If you still want to go along with the adoption and find a new home for you dog, please take the time to carefully read the following guidelines:

Where to Start – Tips for Adoption

Do You Really Have To Re-home Your Dog?

Screening for Potential Homes

Used with permission. Adapted by German Shepherd Rescue and Adoptions, Inc from “When You Can’t Keep Your Chow Chow” written by Karen Privitello, Lisa Hrico & Barbara Malone, Chow Chow Welfare League of NPD, Inc. Reproduction other than for personal home use is prohibited without permission of the Chow Chow Club, Inc.’s Welfare Committee. For additional copies or permission to reprint, contact: The Chow Chow Club Inc.’s Welfare Committee 9828 E. County A Janesville, WI 53546 Chow Chow Welfare Hotline 608-756-2008

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